The Origins of Self Help

“Has not self-help accomplished all the great things of the world? How many young men falter, faint, and dally with their purpose because they have no capital to start with, and wait for some good luck to give them a lift. But success is the child of drudgery and perseverance. It cannot be coaxed or bribed; pay the price, and it is yours. A constant struggle, a ceaseless battle to bring success from inhospitable surroundings, is the price of all great achievements.” Orison Swett Marden

The “Ecclesiastical History of the English Speaking People” was a book chronicling the history of England from the time of Julius Caesar in AD 55 to the time of it’s authorship it in 731, Saint Bede, the author, advises his readers that the biographies and lives chronicled in the book were for imitation and learning. “If history records good things,” he says, “Then the thoughtful reader is encouraged to imitate what is good. If it records bad things, then the thoughtful reader is encouraged to avoid that which is bad.” His principle was to learn from history and extract lessons from both the good and the bad. It is this lesson that was most important to Bede, the illustrations and biographies only served as examples of good living and that if one was diligent enough one would learn what not to do in certain circumstances and most importantly, what to do.

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“Either write something worth reading, or do something worth writing.” Ben Franklin

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Paul Gwamanda

“Either write something worth reading, or do something worth writing.” Ben Franklin